Lettuce talk about your Dietary Needs

Jul 1

Lettuce talk about your Dietary Needs

Gone are the days when “Vegetarians” were limited to lettuce and shredded carrots as their only choice when eating out. Special dietary requirements have grown more than 50% in the last few years, people are eating less meat and allergies are becoming more prevalent. Almost 10% of Americans identify as vegetarians. How can you plan a conference and make sure everyone has healthy, nutritional and satisfying meals? Let us help and take this worry off your “plate.”

Meals are a large part of the Chubb Hotel and Conference Center experience and they can make the overall experience more enjoyable and memorable. When planning your next event, it is never too early to discuss your dietary requirements. Sales, Planners, as well as kitchen and wait staff are educated in ever changing dietary requirements.  Your discussion on dietary needs start with your sales person. Then your planner working closely with the chef and kitchen staff will get into more detail tailoring menus to your specific needs.

What you need to know

 There are three categories of food requests;

 Allergy which is defined as a medical condition in which exposure to certain food will trigger a harmful immune response, avoidance is critical to their health.    Some common food allergies are: Nuts, shellfish, dairy, eggs, wheat, soy.

Intolerance do not involve the immune system and do not cause severe allergic reactions; the effects may be uncomfortable but are not life threatening.  Common food intolerances are gluten and lactose.

Preferences are choices desired but not medically dictated.        Common preferences are religious or health conscious based.

 

Be in the know with these foodie terms;

Vegetarian – meat free diet

     Lacto -Ovo vegetarian – can eat both eggs and dairy

     Lacto-vegetaians – can eat dairy but not eggs

     Ovo-vegetarians – can eat eggs but not dairy

     Pescatarian – can eat fish

Vegan – a person who does not use or consume animal products

Wheat Free – Cannot tolerate wheat or wheat by products, gluten is ok.

 Gluten Free – Cannot tolerate gluten, No wheat

*Gluten is a protein found in many grains, including wheat. Wheat is simply a grain that contains gluten. A gluten-free diet will be free from wheat and all grains and processed foods that contain gluten, but a wheat free diet will not necessarily be free of gluten.

Celiac Disease – a serious autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically predisposed people where the ingestion of gluten leads to damage in the small intestine

 Tree Nut Allergy vs. Peanut Allergy – peanuts are legumes, whereas a tree nut is a hard-shelled nut, some people may be able to tolerate one kind of nut, some none at all

 Paleo – consists mainly of meat, fish, vegetables and fruit, excludes dairy and processed foods

Keto – a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet

Kosher – defined by Jewish law it involves not only specific foods but style of preparation as well

Halal – foods defined by Islamic law

 

Our chefs and kitchen staff are well versed on special food needs and they incorporate vegan, vegetarian, paleo and other food options into our daily buffet for all to enjoy. For religious restrictions, we do work with certified suppliers to fulfill your needs. You will find our “specialty meals” nourishing as well as aesthetically pleasing to the eye.

At Chubb Hotel and Conference Center all foods are clearly labeled with ingredients as well as allergen content.

Guests can feel assured that they can enjoy the whole experience and can safely consume the meals as well as any snacks or beverages here at Chubb Hotel and Conference Center, give us a call today to set up your meeting or special event!!! We are more than happy to make arrangements for all food needs for your group large or small.

Bon Appetit!

Sun Lee & Karen Boyskey

 

References:

IACC: Guide to Managing Conference Delegate Dietary Requirements

IACC: What You Need to Know About Accommodating Special Diets in Meetings

Event Manager Blog: How to Plan for Attendees with Special Diets